Wildlife management

The Cape’s wildlife is continually under threat. Certain animal species are in conflict with humans, exploited for commercial gain, threatened by the erosion of their natural habitat through human development, or hunted for sport and recreation.

The effective conservation of wildlife is a vital part of our protection of the Western Cape’s rich natural heritage. CapeNature’s Wildlife Management Programme integrates ecological and socioeconomic objectives, supported by cooperative governance. The programme’s success relies on the involvement of all key stakeholders in sustainable managing of the province’s wildlife resources.

Landowner’s Guide to Human-Wildlife Conflict
CapeNature has put together a publication called the Landowner’s Guide to Human-Wildlife Conflict: Sensible solutions to living with Wildlife. This guide, developed for the agricultural sector, hopes to provide you with information, tips to deal with the conflict and a way to holistically manage your livelihood (stock or crops).

Human-wildlife conflict management now requires an integrated or holistic approach towards solving these problems, and this guide will prove an invaluable tool for landowners. To download the guide, click the image below. It is also available in Afrikaans here.

Landowners-guide-cover

 

Also available for landowners is a publication compiled by Belinda Ashton with support from the International Fund for Animal Welfare, entitled Living with our Wild Neighbours, which you can download here.

Baboon management

As part of our Wildlife Management Programme, we work with South African National Parks and the City of Cape Town to manage baboons in the Western Cape.

Due to development and expansion, baboons are left with smaller habitats and increasingly come into contact with people. When we feed them, they come to associate us with food. As a result, baboons in urban areas may raid homes and garbage bins for food.

We have developed a plan with our partners to reduce the frequency and severity of these raids. You can view the protocol here: Protocol for raiding baboons

CapeNature has also developed a plan to manage the use of paintball markers to keep baboons away from urban areas: Protocol and SOP for Using Paintball Markers

The environmentally friendly paint pellets are only fired at the baboon’s flank and rear to avoid injury.

The Human Wildlife Services’ reports on baboon management are available below.

Baboon Management – April 2016 HWS Report

Baboon Management – March 2016 HWS Report

Baboon Management – February 2016 HWS Report

Baboon Management – January 2016 HWS Report

Baboon Management – HWS Annual Report 2015

Baboon Management – December 2015 HWS Report

Baboon Management – November 2015 HWS Report

Baboon Management – October 2015 HWS Report

Baboon Management – September 2015 HWS Report

Baboon Management – August 2015 HWS Report

Baboon Management – July 2015 HWS Report

Baboon Management – June 2015 HWS Report

Baboon Management – May 2015 HWS Report

Baboon Management – April 2015 HWS Report

Baboon Management – March 2015 HWS Report

Baboon Management – February 2015 HWS Report

Baboon Management – January 2015 HWS Report

Baboon Management – December 2014 HWS Report

Baboon Management – November 2014 HWS Report

Baboon Management – October 2014 HWS Report

Baboon Management – September 2014 HWS Report

Baboon Management – August 2014 HWS Report (Special annual edition)

Baboon Management – July 2014 HWS Report

Baboon Management – June 2014 HWS Report

Baboon Management – May 2014 HWS Report

Baboon Management – April 2014 HWS Report

Baboon Management – March 2014 HWS Report

Baboon Management – January 2014 HWS Report

Baboon Management – December 2013 HWS Report

Baboon Management – November 2013 HWS Report

Baboon Management – October 2013 HWS Report

Baboon Management – September 2013 HWS Report

Baboon Management – August 2013 HWS Report

Baboon Management – July 2013 HWS Report

Baboon Management – June 2013 HWS Report

Baboon Management – May 2013 HWS Report

Baboon Management – April 2013 HWS Report

Baboon Management – March 2013 HWS Report

Baboon Management – February 2013 HWS Report

Baboon Management – January 2013 HWS Report

Endangered species

A number of species are at risk of extinction in the Western Cape. CapeNature works to protect these animals by conserving their natural habitats, monitoring their populations and raising awareness. To find out more about the top 10 endangered species in the Western Cape, click here.

The management and history of Damage Causing Animals (DCAs)